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  EPOXY RESINS PAINT

(Info and Links to Buy/Purchase Epoxy Paint)

 

Epoxy paint - learn and buy - epoxy paint vs floor epoxy paint

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from www.epoxyproducts.com/epoxypaint_urethane_polyurethane_primer.html:

Epoxy Resin Paints

 

 Epoxy paints are epoxy resins with pigments and often a few other additives. Most are 100% solids or nearly 100% solids.  There are water based epoxy floor paints too.

Epoxies are known for strong adhesion, good chemical resistance, and a thick and hard coating. They yellow and breakdown in UV so they are often used as the base coat or 'working' coat and then top coated with an attractive "regular" paint for looks.


EPOXY PAINT BASICS

Epoxy paint is basically epoxy resin and curing agent with pigment and a thixotrophic (gelling - stiffening)  agent. This helps it hang evenly on vertical surfaces, rather than slump and slide to the bottom of the wall. Note that raw epoxy resins systems, such as marine epoxy and floor epoxy paints do not have thixotrophic additives. The floor epoxy paints are designed to flow out and self level easily. Thixotrophic additives do not help them do that.

 

All epoxies yellow and weather in sunlight (UV) which makes them color unstable. This is not a problem indoors but outside it is common to top coat epoxy paint with latex or enamel or polyurethane paints which protect the epoxy paint from UV damage and are color stable. In effect, the epoxy paint does the 'work' of sealing, water proofing, providing chemical protection, providing a good bond and a thick layer, while the non epoxy paint top coat provides the look and gloss desired.

 

Epoxy paint products provide corrosion protection by acting as a physical barrier between the metal and oxygen in the air. Generally being a thick coating, it also fills small cracks and voids and rough areas on the surfaces of wood, metal and  cement. Tanks, pits, sumps, ship hulls (below the water line),  pipes (inside and out) are places that epoxy paint is commonly found.

 

 


Introducing Corro-Coat FC 2100 Family of Solvent-Free Epoxy Resin Paints


Introduced in October of 2001 by
Progressive Epoxy Polymers, Inc. the Corro-Coat FC (Fiber/Ceramic) 2100 family of epoxy paints represent a new generation of heavy duty, brutal environment epoxy coatings and linings. The Corro-Coat FC epoxies combine the best features of today's workhorse coatings, thus allowing engineers and maintenance professionals to use Corro-Coat FC 2100 as a "specified equivalent coating" over an extremely wide range of applications. FC 2100 forms an extremely hard, abrasion and wear resistant coating.

Meet the FC 2100 Epoxy Paint Family

This product contains superior Cycloaliphatic curing agents - CLICK HERE for cycloaliphatic epoxy paint and  for more information.

FC 2100 forms an extremely hard, abrasion and wear resistant coating.

Contains Kevlar ™ pulp and feldspar ceramic for enhanced abrasion resistance.

This product comes in several 'epoxy flavors'


FC 2100 A - the original version (formerly FC 2100) - 2:1 mix ratio,


FC 2100 FAST - a fast version (actually used for application cold temperatures - say 40 - 55 F)

Now you can use FC 2100 FAST in air or water temperatures as low as 38 degrees F. Use the fast version in temps. of 35 to 65 degrees F, the 2100 F and 2100 A in temps over 60 degrees. This FAST version (like the high temp version) requires hazmat or ORM-D shipping (must be shipped via ground only - no extra shipping charges).


 

Key Beneficial Properties of FC 2100 epoxy paint

 

* Solvent-free (representing the new generation of 0% VOC, 100% solids epoxies)

* Non-Hazmat - Using a higher grade of resins/curing agents allows the standard, novolac and flex versions of FC 2100 to be shipped outside of Haz-Mat restrictions, thus FC 2100 can be air shipped overnight to job sites (or outside the USA) without extremely costly and restrictive Haz-Mat requirements.


* Contains
Kevlar (tm) micro fibers which provides an extremely inert filler and thickener that reinforces the epoxy internally against hairline cracking and chipping, while aiding in the bridging of small gaps and cracks.


* The inclusion of feldspar - ceramic plates/needles provides the extreme abrasive resistance associated with non-hollow ceramic epoxy additives. The ceramics may also improve chemical resistance and other properties. The ASTM D2240 Shore D Hardness value is 91 (most epoxies have values of 70-82).

NOTE: The use of Kevlar (tm) and feldspar ceramic in fc 2100 reduce the "natural give/flex" common with cycloaliphatic epoxies, resulting is a harder and more abrasive resistant finish.


* Non-blushing formulation means the epoxy can be recoated without the worry about
amine blushing (in epoxy resins) damaging the bond of any overlying topcoat epoxy or urethane.


* Can be applied
underwater (underwater epoxies) r nearly as easily as upon a dry surface. This is extremely useful on damp or saturated surfaces as well as on submerged surfaces such as pilings, dams, and docks. (always test at job site, due to potential site specific adhesion problems associated with underwater application of epoxies).


* High build, single coat viscosity. Applicators and end users judge epoxies by how thick they are to work with and how thick the coating can be applied to a vertical surface. FC 2100 can be applied to a smooth vertical surface at 15-30 plus mils (30 mils equals 76 microns) without dripping or sagging. It is at the upper viscosity limit for roller application, thus it can be applied in several ways; brush, roller, or edger/spreader. Note: rollers generally apply most solvent free epoxy paints at about 8 mils or about 140 square feet per gallon.

compressive strength - ASTM D695 10,000 PSI

tensile strength - ASTM D638 4,800 PSI

abrasion - ASTM D4060 0.10 gm loss

water absorption - ASTM D570 0.10%

flexural strength - ASTM D790 6,600 PSI

shore d hardness - ASTM D2240 91

heat distortion - ASTM D649 124 F



Results of tests by one of our users 3/7/02


Wed, 6 Mar 2002 13:17:35 -0500
From: "JN"
To: <info@epoxyproducts.com>


Paul,

We applied the FC2100... to a piece of 6" steel pipe.
We blasted the steel, preheated it to 150 degrees F and applied the mixed
coating with a brush. We managed a nice coating build thickness of 50 mils or
so. The coating did not sag or icicle from the bottom...


 

EPOXY PAINT BASICS

Epoxy paint is basically epoxy resin and curing agent with pigment and a thixotrophic (gelling - stiffening)  agent. This helps it hang evenly on vertical surfaces, rather than slump and slide to the bottom of the wall. Note that raw epoxy resins systems, such as marine epoxy and floor epoxy paints do not have thixotrophic additives. The floor epoxy paints are designed to flow out and self level easily. Thixotrophic additives do not help them do that.

 

All epoxies yellow and weather in sunlight (UV) which makes them color unstable. This is not a problem indoors but outside it is common to top coat epoxy paint with latex or enamel or polyurethane paints which protect the epoxy paint from UV damage and are color stable. In effect, the epoxy paint does the 'work' of sealing, water proofing, providing chemical protection, providing a good bond and a thick layer, while the non epoxy paint top coat provides the look and gloss desired.

 

Epoxy paint products provide corrosion protection by acting as a physical barrier between the metal and oxygen in the air. Generally being a thick coating, it also fills small cracks and voids and rough areas on the surfaces of wood, metal and  cement. Tanks, pits, sumps, ship hulls (below the water line),  pipes (inside and out) are places that epoxy paint is commonly found.

 
Order this product by calling 603-435-7199 anytime or order online using this link: EPOXY NOW

 


Purchase these products
 
coal tar epoxy paint
corro coat fc 2100 A (kevlar (tm) reinforced)
Water Gard 300 (underwater pool repair)
NSP 120 (potable water)
CM 15 (long pot life - flexible) epoxy paint

from tax free New Hampshire --  CLICK HERE


Epoxy Paint Related Questions?

 

epoxy help

Click Here to access the Professor's

Epoxy Help Web Site

Help from the Granite State of New Hampshire .

 


 

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Purchase these products
 
coal tar epoxy paint
corro coat fc 2100 A (kevlar (tm) reinforced)
Water Gard 300 (underwater pool repair)
NSP 120 (potable water)
CM 15 (long pot life - flexible) epoxy paint

from tax free New Hampshire --  CLICK HERE

 

 

MEMBER - INTERNET EPOXY CONFEDERATION - CLICK HERE


 

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Internet Boating /Boat Building Related Links - CLICK HERE

Internet Floor Coating / Floor Epoxy Links - CLICK HERE

Teflon (tm), graphite, copper powder, MIO - CLICK HERE

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SIMILAR EPOXY SITE

Epoxy Essentials (tm)

 

Reasons for coating failures

Preparation problem 70%; application problem 12%; environment problem 6%; wrong paint selection 9%; bad paint 1%; adding thinner 2%


"At least 70% of premature coatings failures are traced back to 'surface preparation' whether referring to wood, concrete, or metal. In a commercial recoating project, the costs (and profit) associated with surface preparation are about 70% of the job. How extensive the surface preparation is will depend on the performance expectation of the owner... Know the A, B, C's of surface preparation - visible contaminants, invisible contaminants, and profile."

 

Dr. Lydia Frenzel, The ABCs of Surface Preparation, Cleaner Times, April 2001, pg. 42-44.


DID YOU KNOW...

 

Epoxy paints / coatings are used because of their outstanding chemical resistance, durability, low porosity and strong bond strength.
 

Epoxies consist of a ‘base' and a ‘curing' agent. The two components are mixed in a certain ratio. A chemical reaction occurs between the two parts generating heat (exotherm) and hardening the mixture into an inert, hard ‘plastic'.

Epoxies yellow, chalk (or more commonly least lose their gloss), in direct sunlight (UV). The yellowing can be a real problem. For pigmented epoxies select colors that are dark or contain a lot of yellow (such as green). Even clear epoxies will yellow and cloud up. Often epoxies are top coated with latex or urethanes that will retain their color and attractive gloss. This is particularly true if color coding or matching company colors is important.

Epoxies will harden in minutes or hours, but complete cure (hardening) will generally take several days. Most epoxies will be suitably hard within a day or so, but may require more time to harden before the coating can be sanded.

By their nature, epoxies are hard and brittle. Additives can be added to epoxies that make them less brittle, but generally at the loss or reduction of other positive epoxy properties such as chemical resistance.

Other clues of cheap epoxies include ‘induction time' (after mixing the two components the mixture must sit for several minutes to ‘self cook' before being applied).

The best time to recoat epoxy is within about 48 hours after the initial coat. Because epoxies take days to reach full cure, a second coat applied shortly after the first coat will partially fuse to the first coat rather than forming a simple mechanical bond.

End users can thicken epoxy with many things, Tiny glass spheres, known as micro-spheres or micro-balloons are commonly used. Besides thickening, their crushable nature makes sanding the hardened epoxy easier. On the downside, they work like tiny ball bearings, resulting is sagging and slumping. Another thickener is fumed silica (a common brand name is Cabosil (tm)) which looks like fake snow. About 2 parts fumed silica with one part epoxy will produce a mixture similar in texture and thickness to petroleum jelly. Micro-spheres and fumed silica can be combined together.

Fisheyes are areas on a painted surface where the coating literally pulls away for the substrate leaving a coatingless void or fisheye. Often fisheyes are caused by surface contaminants such as a bit of silicon, wax, or oil. I have also seen them on clean plywood where epoxies paints have been used as sealers and the problem might be due to uneven saturation (soaking-in) of the epoxy into the wood. Surface tension plays a big part in fisheyeing. There are some additives that can be mixed into the epoxy that will reduce surface tension. Likewise, on wood, applying several coats of solvent thinned epoxy, instead of one coat of unthinned epoxy, seems to work well. Applying a thick coat of epoxy over a contaminated fisheye surface will bury the fisheye but expect the coating to peel away in the future. As a rule of thumb, always suspect some sort of surface contamination as the primary cause of fisheyeing.

Adding a bit of solvent to a solvent based or solvent-free epoxy is something that most manufacturers would not officially approve of and something that might not work with all epoxies. However, it can be done (unofficially) with the epoxies I deal with. Adding solvent to these epoxies will: 1) thin them out; 2) increase pot life; 3) allows them to flow off the brush/roller a bit more smoothly; and 4) perhaps allows them to ‘soak-in', penetrate, or may be soften, the substrate just a little bit. Not change is visible in the epoxy unless 12% or greater solvent is added. With that amount of solvent, the epoxies no longer cure with a glossy finish.

It is best to use epoxies with a mix ratio close to 1 to 1 as opposed to something 4-1, 5-1, etc. because errors in the mix ratios can be more pronounced with the latter. That said, no matter what the mix ratio is, some epoxies are more forgiving of mix ratio errors than others. One ‘trick' of epoxy vendors with odd or very sensitive mix ratios is to sell calibrated pumps that disperse the epoxy components in exact amounts.


How Thick? How thick should your coating be? Economics play a major role in determining how much coating to apply. One U.S. gallon contains 231 cubic inches. That's only 1.6 cubic square feet of surface at one inch thick and that's also assuming a solvent-free product. If the product is 25% VOC (i.e. 25% solvent) then dry thickness/coverage will be 25% less. Again, assuming a 1/4 inch thick coating (250 mils) maximum coverage will still be only 6.4 square feet per gallon. A solvent-free (100% solids) epoxy coating applied at 16 mils will cover 100 square feet per gallon (note: the wall paint in your office is probably 2-4 mils). While thick coatings sound like a good idea, they use so much product that they must be made very cheaply so that coating 1,000 or 10,000 square feet can still be done at a competitive price. A high quality, fairly expensive product with a coverage rate of 100 sq. feet or more per gallon, on the other hand, will have a low enough cost per sq. foot to provide both economy and top quality.


 

Epoxy paint - learn and buy - epoxy paint vs floor epoxy paint

 Epoxy Paint - what are two part epoxy paints?